Twitch Partnering with Gaming Nonprofit to Build HBCU Esports League

    • Out of the 200 schools with varsity esports teams in North America, Morehouse College is currently the only HBCU.
    • The Twitch league will provide HBCU students educational and scholarship support and help HBCUs expand their esports programs.

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Amazon-owned live streaming service Twitch is helping to build an esports league for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, according to The Verge.

Through Twitch Student, the league will provide HBCU students educational and scholarship support and also help HBCUs expand their esports programs.

The company is partnering with Cxmmunity – an organization that facilitates participation of minorities in esports and the video game industry – in the endeavor. 

“As a graduate of an HBCU and knowing first hand how we’re underrepresented and just lack the access to get into gaming, I’m excited to be working with Twitch to fulfill our mission in increasing the participation of minorities within these industries and close the digital divide.” Chris Peay, cofounder of Cxmmunity, said in a statement.

Two hundred colleges in North America are involved in Tespa, the National Association of Collegiate Esports, and the Collegiate State League, Twitch said. Morehouse College is the only HBCU currently involved, however.

The first HBCU league esports games will stream on Aug. 2 on the Cxmmunity’s Twitch channel.

On July 5, HBCU Heroes hosted the first-ever HBCU esports tournament, which featured six schools. The event was scheduled to support the release of the John Lewis documentary “JOHN LEWIS: GOOD TROUBLE,” and included Larry Ridley – NBC sportscaster and the former voice of Madden NFL – and Atlanta Dream player Renee Montgomery.

The league also aims to help end the racial disparity between video game creators and those who play video games by being a “pipeline for Black talent in the esports industry,” the companies said.