NIL Marketplaces Go Local

    • In the months leading up to the NIL era, dozens of marketplaces sprouted up to help facilitate deals with athletes nationwide.
    • But now, that trend is beginning to shift: NIL companies are going local.

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In the months leading up to the NIL era, dozens of marketplaces sprouted up to help facilitate deals. 

Some tried to develop relationships with athletes at universities near their headquarters. But they mostly had one thing in common: They were aiming at signing athletes nationwide.

Now, that trend is beginning to shift. NIL companies are going local. 

Wealthy alumni, donors, and even existing NIL companies are focused on bridging the gap between athletes and local businesses. Here are just a few examples:

  • “Division Street,” a company created to help Oregon athletes maximize NIL potential, partnered with Opendorse to create a school-specific marketplace.
  • A group called the “Clark Field Collective” raised $10 million from alumni and local business leaders to distribute in NIL deals specifically to University of Texas athletes.
  • MarketPryce created a division called “MarketPryce Florida” to help University of Florida athletes sign deals with local businesses.
  • INFLCR launched a software called “INFLCR+ Local Exchange” that gives schools the ability to customize deal reporting and give companies an avenue to connect with athletes.

Most of the schools with these programs appear to be in the Power 5 — but that could change. 

“I believe this model can 100% work in any college town that has a strong alumni and fan base,” MarketPryce CEO and co-founder Jason Bergman told FOS.