How Laurence Marsach Became Overtime’s Star Personality

Overtime Larry - Laurence Marsach
Photo via Overtime on YouTube

In the last three years, Overtime has burst onto the scene as a popular provider of high school and college sports content — and at the forefront of that coverage is Laurence Marsach.

Marsach — known to many as Overtime Larry — is one of the company’s crown jewels. The 26-year-old New York native works as a content creator and hosts well-known shows like “The Overtime Challenge.”

“Larry’s love of Overtime is inspiring to both our audience and our team,” said Overtime Co-Founder and President Zack Weiner. “Overtime is all about letting you see the amazing personalities behind these incredible talents, and Larry helps us make that happen.”

Marsach has been with the company since it launched in 2015, starting out as an intern and working his way up to become an indispensable part of the team on the content side. Since then, he’s done segments with some of the biggest names in sports, from LaMelo Ball to Trae Young.

It’s awesome,” he said. “It’s amazing. I love to see their growth… I’m so proud of these guys.”

Because he works with younger players who are at the high school and college level, Marsach jumps at opportunities to serve as a mentor.

“Anytime I get the chance, I give advice, whether it’s on school or finances, or to help them in their careers, or just talk in their ear,” he said. “I see them as little brothers. A lot of people see them as big-time celebrities, and they are big-time, but they know they’re younger than me, and I’ve been through college and recruiting. I know how that goes, so I can relate to them.”

Compared to stars in the midst of their professional careers, Marsach said the younger players tend to be modest and easy to work with.

“They have less of an ego,” he said. “They want to have that media attention because they can grow on social media and have more opportunities and friends, but also … we try to make it fun. It’s what the kids want to see.”

SEE MORE: Overtime Has Become a Sports Network for the Next Generation

“We don’t take ourselves too seriously,” he added. “I’m silly — I’ll get pied in the face. I’m just having fun with younger kids.”

In a market saturated with sports content, Marsach said it’s his genuineness that sets him apart and draws the audience in.

“To be honest, I feel like I’m real,” he said. “I’m just going to be me at all times. I’m never going to switch up.”

Younger generations can relate to Marsach — from his sports experience, to his sense of style, to his cultural awareness.

“I’m from New York, I’m 26, I’m into culture and fashion,” he said. “I’ve been an athlete all my life — I played basketball and baseball. Kids see that I’m an athlete, as well. I’m about it, and I speak the way they speak.”

Part of what makes Larry so special is his ability to connect with these young athletes,” added Weiner. “They feel like they are hanging out with a friend, or even a brother, and that disarms them in a positive way.”

“The Overtime Challenge” is a perfect example of his ability to connect to players. The segments feature speed questions, skills challenges, and shooting contests, with Marsach jumping in and participating alongside the players.

“‘The Overtime Challenge’ — it’s been awesome to be a part of it and see the growth of it from episode to episode, understanding how to tie things together and being on set, getting everything done,” Marsach said. “That’s why these kids follow me or hit me up. I’m relatable, and I’m not tight and stiff and asking questions like, ‘What was going through your head?’”

“‘The Overtime Challenge’ is one of our flagship shows, and Larry has done a tremendous job at progressing as a host as the series evolves,” Weiner said.

It’s clear that “The Overtime Challenge” has been a massive hit; Marsach’s challenge with LaMelo Ball received nearly 1.8 million views on YouTube, for example. In addition to “The Overtime Challenge,” Marsach hosts a lie detector show and a “Judge Larry” show, which are also some of Overtime’s most popular segments.

“I love being a character,” he said. “The lie detector stuff, ‘Judge Larry’ — it’s right up my alley. I love to improvise and react once someone says something.”

Since he’s been with Overtime, Marsach has become a full-blown internet sensation, with more than 65,000 Instagram followers. His popularity on social media has led to big-time opportunities in real life, as well.

“For sure, the coolest thing through Overtime is I got to throw out the first pitch at Dodger Stadium,” he said. “I was a pitcher, and that dream didn’t come true, so to be in front of thousands of people — you can’t beat that. In that same day, Kanye West threw out the first pitch in Chicago. I was like, ‘Am I a celebrity, as well?’”

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He’s still not satisfied, though — Marsarch has considerable goals both in the sports world and beyond.

“I’m trying to be guy that is known within all sports within the next generation,” he said. “I also want to be involved in big-time shows, like on Netflix.”

In the meantime, Marsach will continue to elevate Overtime as the company gains speed in the sports industry.

“The team that’s surrounding me is amazing,” he said. “We’re very driven. We just care that you get your job done, and you’re hustling… We’re trying to keep creating great content, and we want to keep telling stories, and do it in our own way.”