Gaming Companies Taking Steps to Create Inclusive Environments

  • Activision Blizzard is among a growing list of video game companies embracing transparent pay.
  • The desire to implement change comes amid several controversies shrouding the industry.
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Having become notorious for unhealthy work conditions and allegations of sexism and discrimination against women, the video game industry is working to become a more inclusive environment. 

Activision Blizzard is among a growing list of video game companies embracing transparent pay in an effort to combat wage discrimination and unfavorable work conditions. 

  • In April, Activision added two women, Lulu Cheng Meservey and Kerry Carr, to its board.
  • However, the discrepancies aren’t exclusive to the U.S,. as men at U.K. game companies made 17.1% more than women in 2021, per Gamesindustry.biz. 

The desire to implement change comes amid several controversies shrouding the industry. 

Activision was facing a class-action lawsuit in California that claimed the video game publisher misled investors regarding allegations of sexual harassment and discrimination.

The lawsuit — filed by shareholders in 2021 — was dismissed in April. 

Riot Games, the developer of “League of Legends,” faced legal issues of its own after it agreed to pay a $100 million gender discrimination settlement in December 2021. 

PlayStation is also facing a potential class-action gender discrimination lawsuit in California by a former employee after a federal judge dismissed her initial lawsuit in April. 

Taking a Stand 

The need for change within the gaming industry has empowered its workforce. 

In May, employees of Raven Software — a subsidiary of Activision — voted to form a union, which would be the first for a public gaming company in the U.S.

Activision plans to negotiate with the Communications Workers of America over a collective bargaining agreement.